Jane Ginsborg

Associate Director of Research

PhD, BA (Open), BA (York), DipGSMD, C.Psychol., AFBPsS, FHEA

Email: jane.ginsborg@rncm.ac.uk

Professor Jane Ginsborg has held the position of Associate Director of Research since 2009 and fulfils the roles of Programme Leader for Research Degrees and Director of the Centre for Music Performance Research (formerly the Research Centre for the Vocational Training of Musicians) where she was appointed Research Fellow in 2005. Between 2012 and 2015 she served as President of the European Society for the Cognitive Sciences of Music (ESCOM). 

One of those rare music psychologists who is a musician as well as a psychologist, Jane read music at the University of York and studied singing at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama. Following a successful career as a singer, she graduated in psychology from the Open University, and undertook her doctoral research at Keele University. Winner of the British Voice Association’s Van Lawrence Award in 2002 for her research on singers’ memorizing strategies, she is Managing Editor of Music Performance Research, Associate Editor of the Journal of Interdisciplinary Music Studies and Musicae Scientiae and a member of the editorial boards of Psychology of Music and Performance Science (specialty section of Frontiers in Psychology). Her AHRC-funded project “Interactive performance for musicians with a hearing impairment”(in collaboration with the University of Liverpool) was shortlisted for the Times Higher Education Best Research Project of 2013; she is currently Principal Investigator for the “Better Practice” strand of the Musical Impact research project (also AHRC-funded). This strand seeks to promote healthy lifestyles and practice for musicians from the earliest years throughout their education and training and into the profession. Jane’s other interests include the development of musical expertise, music in the ‘third age’, and musicians’ strategies for practising, learning, memorizing and performing both individually and in groups.

 

Current and Future Research

Jane is particularly interested in the social and cognitive processes underlying experts’ individual and collaborative rehearsal and performance. She uses observational and experimental methods to investigate the relationship between practice, rehearsal and performance, particularly in student and professional duos (singers / pianists; violinists; flautists / pianists) and small ensembles such as quartets and quintets; she also uses self-report, diary and interview methods to explore individuals’ qualitative experiences of music-making.  She has published widely on expert musicians’ approaches to practising and memorizing, and won the British Voice Association’s Van Lawrence Award in 2002 for her research on singers’ memorizing strategies. This research was inspired by but did not draw on her own experience; in recent years she has been developing practice-led approaches such as the longitudinal case study method to investigate her own strategies for practice, rehearsal and performance, and she is now working with students and other professionals to help them use this method to explore their own practice. 

From 2013 to 2017 Jane is one of three Principal Investigators on an AHRC-funded research project, Musical Impact: Enhancing the health and wellbeing of musicians, with Prof. Aaron Williamon (RCM), Dr Emma Redding (Trinity Laban) and colleagues from all nine UK conservatoires. International collaborations, supported in part by a Leverhulme International Academic Fellowship enabling Jane to visit six centres in Australia in the spring of 2014, include research contributing to another large-scale research project, Advancing Interdisciplinary Research on Singing (2009-2016) in which Jane is a Co-Investigator on Theme 2.2, Singing and Education / Formal Training. From 2016 to 2019 Jane will be Co-Investigator on a project supported by the Colt Foundation to explore (as yet) “hidden” hearing loss in musicians, with colleagues from the University of Manchester Department of Audiology. Between 2010 and 2013 Jane investigated the interactive music-making of people with hearing impairments in a study undertaken in collaboration with Prof. Carl Hopkins at the University of Liverpool, also funded by the AHRC, and shortlisted for a Times Higher Educational Award of Best Research Project of 2013.

College and External Research Roles

Chair, RNCM Research Degrees Programme Committee; RNCM Research Ethics Committee

Member, RNCM Research Committee, Research & Enterprise Management Committee, Human Resources Committee, Joint Consultative Committee, Wellbeing and Engagement Group, REF Advisory Panel

Chair, Conservatoires UK (CUK) Research Ethics Committee, 2011-2013

President, European Society for the Cognitive Sciences of Music (ESCOM) 2012-2015 

Chair, Ninth Triennial Conference of the European Society for the Cognitive Sciences of Music, 17-22 August 2015 at RNCM (www.escom2015.org)

Chair, Music in the Third Age: Practice and Research, 25 November 2015 at RNCM

Managing Editor, Music Performance Research

Associate Editor (Music Performance), Journal of Interdisciplinary Music Studies

Associate Editor, Musicae Scientiae

Member of Editorial Board, Psychology of Music

Member of Society for Education, Music and Psycholgy Research (SEMPRE) Committee 

Member of Music and Science Steering Committee, Institute for Musical Research

Member of Management Committee, Practice-as-Research Consortium NorthWest (PARC-NW)

External Examiner: MSc in Performance Science, Royal College of Music, 2011-2015

External Examiner, PhD: De Montfort University; Griffiths University, Brisbane, Australia; Ghent University, Belgium; Institute of Education, University of London; Royal College of Music; Sibelius Academy, Helsinki; Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance/City University; University of Brighton; University of Sheffield; Guildhall School of Music and Drama; Sydney Conservatorium, Australia

 

Research Funding

January 2016: Colt Foundation: Time to face the music: Addressing hearing health in future professional musicians (with Piers Dawes [PI], Chris Armitage, Dave Moore, Kevin Munro and Chris Plack, University of Manchester) – £152,329 (2016-2019)

March 2013: AHRC: Musical Impact: Enhancing musicians’ health and wellbeing (with Aaron Williamon, Royal College of Music and Emma Redding, Trinity-Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance – £974,961 (2013-2017)

Feb 2013: Leverhulme Trust International Academic Fellowship (January-March 2014)

Nov 2009: AHRC: Interactive performance for musicians with a hearing impairment (with Carl Hopkins, Acoustics Research Unit, School of Architecture, University of Liverpool) – £299,000 (2010-2013)

Dec 2008: Advancing Interdisciplinary Research in Singing (funded 2009-2016 – I am one of 41 Co-Investigators and 33 Collaborators) by Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada – Principal Investigator Dr Annabel Cohen, Director, Music Cognition Lab, University of  Prince Edward Island) – CA$2,500,000.

July 2007:  Palatine Development Award: Promoting excellence in small group music  performance: teaching, learning and assessment (with Richard Wistreich, then at the International Centre for Music Studies, University of Newcastle) – £10,000.

Undergraduate Teaching

Level 1 (Year 1): Professional Skills 1

Level 3 (Year 4): Performance and Repertoire Studies IV

Level 3 (Years 3 and 4): Elective: Applied Music Psychology: Theory and Practice

Level 3 (Years 3 and 4): Elective: Applied Music Psychology: Research Methods

Level 3 (Year 4): Practical Pedagogy

Postgraduate Teaching

Performing Research: Methods in Music Psychology

Supervisor: Music Psychology Projects Major (12,000 words) and Minor (8,000 words)

Lecture Recital

PGCE

Programme Leader, Research Degrees (MPhil and PhD, validated and awarded by Manchester Metropolitan University)

Research Supervision

Research Supervision

Robert Fulford: AHRC-funded PhD student, Interactive Performance for Musicians with a Hearing Impairment (2010-2013)

Karin Greenhead: MPhil / PhD student (part-time; secondary supervisor), Dalcroze eurhythmics and dynamic rehearsal techniques: Reflections on practice (2011-2018)

Raluca Matei: AHRC-funded PhD student, Better Practice (Musical Impact) (2015-2018)

Naomi Norton: AHRC-funded PhD student, Health Education in Instrumental/Vocal Music Lessons: The Teacher’s Perspective (2013-2016)

Anna Zabuska: RNCM-funded MPhil / PhD student (part-time), Motivational issues in music performance students (2011-2017)

 

Publications

    Journal Articles

  • Ginsborg, J., Chaffin, R. and Demos, A. (2014). Different roles for prepared and spontaneous thoughts: A practice-based study of musical performance from memory. Journal of Interdisciplinary Music Studies, 6(2) 201-232 .
  • Ginsborg, J. (2014). The influence of interactions between music and lyrics: What factors underlie the intelligibility of sung text?. Empirical Music Review, 9(1) 21-24 .
  • Fine, P. and Ginsborg, J. (2014). Making myself understood: Perceived factors affecting the intelligibility of sung text. Frontiers in Psychology, 5(809) , doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2014.00809.
  • Fulford, R. and Ginsborg, J. (2014). Can you hear me? Effects of hearing impairments on verbal and nonverbal communication during collaborative musical performance. Psychology of Music, 42(6) 846-855 , doi:10.1177/0305735614545196.
  • Oakland, J. and Ginsborg, J. (2013). Continuing Professional Development in a chamber orchestra: Player and management perspectives. Music Education Research, , doi:10.1080/14613808.2013.788141.
  • Fulford, R. and Ginsborg, J. (2013). The sign language of music: Musical shaping gestures (MSGs) in rehearsal talk by performers with hearing impairments.. Empirical Music Review, 8(1) 53-67 .
  • Ginsborg, J. and King, E. (2012). Rehearsal talk: familiarity and expertise in singer-pianist duos. Musicae Scientiae, 16(2) 148-167 .
  • Ginsborg, J. and Chaffin, R. (2011). Preparation and spontaneity in performance: A singer’s thoughts while singing Schoenberg. Psychomusicology, 21(1&2) 137-158 .
  • Fulford, R., Ginsborg, J. and Goldbart, J. (2011). Learning not to listen: The experiences of musicians with hearing impairments. Music Education Research, 13(4) 429-446 .
  • Woellner, C. and Ginsborg, J. (2011). Team teaching in the conservatoire: The views of music performance staff and students. British Journal of Music Education, 28(3) 301-323 .
  • Woellner, C., Ginsborg, J. and Williamon, A. (2011). Music researchers’ musical engagement. Psychology of Music, 39(3) 364-382 .
  • Stevens, C., Ginsborg, J. and Lester, G. (2011). Backwards and forwards in space and time: Recalling dance movement from long-term memory. Memory Studies, 4 234-250 .
  • Ginsborg, J., Kreutz, G. and Williamon, A. (2009). Health-promoting behaviours in conservatoire students. Psychology of Music, 37(1) 47-60 .
  • Ginsborg, J., Kreutz, G., Thomas, M. and Williamon, A. (2009). Healthy behaviours in music performance and non-music performance students. Health Education, 109(3) 242-258 .
  • Brodsky, W., Kessler, Y., Rubinstein, B., Ginsborg, J. and Henik, A. (2008). The mental representation of music notation: notational audiation. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 34(2) 427-445 .
  • Kreutz, G., Ginsborg, J. and Williamon, A. (2008). Music students’ health problems and health-promoting behaviours. Medical Problems of Performing Artists, 23(1) 3-11 .
  • Ginsborg, J. and Sloboda, J. (2007). Singers’ recall for the words and melody of a new, unaccompanied song. Psychology of Music, 35(3) 421-440 .
  • Ginsborg, J., Chaffin, R. and Nicholson, G. (2006). Shared performance cues in singing and conducting: a content analysis of talk during practice. Psychology of Music, 34(3) 167-194 .
  • Sloboda, J. and Ginsborg, J. (2004). Understanding Expert Memory: the case of the classical pianist. Review of Chaffin, R., Imreh, G. & Crawford, M. (2002), ‘Practicing Perfection: Memory and Piano Performance’. Contemporary Psychology, 49(5) 587-588 .
  • Locke, A. and Ginsborg, J. (2003). Spoken language in the early years: the cognitive and linguistic development of three- to five-year old children from socio-economically deprived backgrounds. Educational and Child Psychology, 20(4) 68-79 .
  • Ginsborg, J. (2002). Classical singers memorising a new song: an observational study. Psychology of Music, 30 56-99 .
  • Locke, A., Ginsborg, J. and Peers, I. (2002). Development and disadvantage: Implications for the early years and beyond. International Journal of Language and Communication Disorders, 3-15 .
  • Ginsborg, J. (1997). Singers memorising a new song: An observational study. Quaderni della SIEM, Societa Italiana per l’Educazione Musicale, 12(2) 78-88 .
  • Conference Contributions

  • Developing familiarity: A new duo’s individual and shared practice features and performance cues given at  International Symposium on Performance Science, Kyoto, Japan 2-5 September
  • Burnout and engagement among music performance students: A quantitative study given at  International Symposium on Performance Science, Kyoto, Japan 2-5 September
  • Hearing aids and music: The experiences of D/deaf musicians given at  Ninth Triennial Conference of the European Society for the Cognitive Sciences of Music, Manchester, UK 17-22 August
  • Health and wellness education for musicians: Investigating music teachers’ perspectives given at  Ninth Triennial Conference of the European Society for the Cognitive Sciences of Music, Manchester, UK 17-22 August
  • Engagement with performance and burnout among music performance students given at  Ninth Triennial Conference of the European Society for the Cognitive Sciences of Music, Manchester, UK 17-22 August
  • Promoting health in music education: Better Practice given at  Ninth Triennial Conference of the European Society for the Cognitive Sciences of Music, Manchester, UK 17-22 August
  • Establishing vibrotactile thresholds on the fingertip for people with and without a hearing impairment over the musical frequence range between C1 and C6. given at  19th International Congress on Sound and Vibration 2012, Lithuania July
  • Interactive performance for musicians with hearing impairments using the vibrotactile mode given at  Proceedings of the Institute of Acoustics, United Kingdom 
  • Sight, sound and synchrony: Effects of attenuating auditory feedback on duo violinists’ behaviours in performance. given at  Proceedings of the 12th International Conference for Music Perception and Cognition, South Korea August
  • Making myself understood: Factors affecting the understanding of sung text. given at  Proceedings of the 12th International Conference for Music Perception and Cognition, South Korea August
  • “Let’s go again from the top”: The role of collaborative rehearsal in learning music given at  International Symposium on Performance Science 2013, Vienna 29 August
  • The effects of hearing impairment on interactive performance: Two observational experiments given at  International Symposium on Performance Science 2013, Vienna 31 August
  • On the potential for vibrotactile technology to facilitate interactive performance for musicians with a hearing impairment given at  Live Interfaces: Performance, Art, Music 2012, Leeds September
  • Perception and learning of relative pitch in the vibrotactile mode given at  Live Interfaces: Performance, Art, Music 2012, Leeds September
  • Measurement of vibroctactile thresholds on the fingertip to assess vibrotactile presentation of musical notes to people with and without a hearing impairment given at  Internoise 2012, New York, NY August
  • Functions and uses of auditory and visual feedback: exploring the possible effects of a hearing impairment on music performance given at  ICMPC and ESCOM 2012, Thessaloniki, Greece July
  • Have we made ourselves clear? Singers’ and non-singers’ perceptions of the intelligibility of sung text given at  International Symposium on Performance Science 2011, Canada August
  • Preparation and spontaneity in performance: A singer’s thoughts while singing Schoenberg given at  Performa 11, Portugal May
  • Focus, effort and enjoyment in chamber music: Rehearsal strategies of successful and “failed” student ensembles. given at  International Symposium on Performance Science 2009, University of Auckland December
  • Moving backwards and forwards in time: Recalling dance movement from long-term memory given at  International Symposium on Performance Science 2009, University of Auckland December
  • Very long term memory for words and music: an expert singer’s written and sung recall over six years given at  2nd International Conference on Music Communication Science 2009, Australia December
  • Profiling musicians: An applied investigation of fitness for performance given at  International Symposium on Performance Science 2009, University of Auckland December
  • The influence of listeners’ singing experience and the number of singers on the understanding of sung text given at  International Symposium on Performance Science 2009, University of Auckland December
  • Feeling Sound: Listeners’ experience of topical pitch perception given at  International Conference on Music Communication Science 2009, Australia December
  • Gestures and glances: The role of expertise and familiarity on singers’ and pianists’ bodily movements in ensemble rehearsals given at  ESCOM 2009, Finland August
  • Serial Position Effects in a Singer’s Long Term Recall: Landmarks and Lacunae in Memory given at  ESCOM 2009, Finland August
  • Long-term Memory for Simple and Complex Music: Quantity and Quality of Practice. given at  10th International Conference on Music Perception & Cognition, 2008, Sapporo, Japan August
  • Edited Books

  • Clegg, J. and Ginsborg, J. (Eds.). (2006) Language and Social Disadvantage: Theory into practice. Chichester, UK: John Wiley & Son Publishers Ltd.
  • Chapters in Books

  • Ginsborg, J. (2014). Research skills in practice: Learning and teaching practice-based research at RNCM In S. Harrison.(Eds.) Research and Research Education in Music Performance and Pedagogy (pp 77-89 ). Amsterdam: Springer.
  • Ginsborg, J. (2014). Elite performance In W. Thompson.(Eds.) Encyclopaedia of Music in the Social and Behavioral Sciences (pp 370-372 ). Thousand Oaks, California, USA: SAGE Publications.
  • Ginsborg, J. (2014). Musical aptitude, tests of In W. Thompson.(Eds.) SAGE Encyclopaedia of Music in the Social and Behavioral Sciences (pp 783-787 ). Thousand Oaks, California, USA: SAGE Publications.
  • Woellner, C., Ginsborg, J. and Williamon, A. (2013). Familiarity and reflexivity in the research process In E. King. and H. Prior.(Eds.) Music and Familiarity: Listening, Musicology and Performance (pp 175-196 ). UK: Ashgate Press.
  • Fulford, R. and Ginsborg, J. (2013). Can you see me? The effects of visual contact on musicians’ movements in performance In M. Wyers. and O. Glieca.(Eds.) Sound Music and the Moving-Thinking Body (pp 109-118 ). Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing.
  • GInsborg, J., Spahn, C. and Williamon, A. (2012). Health promotion in higher music education In R. MacDonald., G. Kreutz. and L. Mitchell.(Eds.) Music, Health and Wellbeing (pp 356-366 ). Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • Ginsborg, J. and Chaffin, R. (2011). Performance cues in singing: evidence from practice and recall In I. Deliege. and J. Davidson.(Eds.) Music and the Mind: Investigating the functions and processes of music (a book in honour of John Sloboda) (pp 339–360 ). Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • King, E. and GInsborg, J. (2011). Gestures and glances: Interactions in ensemble rehearsal In A. Gritten. and E. King.(Eds.) New Perspectives on Music and Gesture (pp 177–201 ). Aldershot, UK: Ashgate Press.
  • Ginsborg, J. (2009). Beating time: The role of kinaesthetic learning in the development of mental representations for music In A. Mornell.(Eds.) Art in Motion: Musical and Athletic Motor Learning and Performance (pp 121–142 ). Vienna: Peter Lang.
  • Ginsborg, J. (2006). Language and Social Disadvantage: The Effects of Socio-Economic Status on Children’s Language Acquisition and Use In J. Clegg. and J. Ginsborg.(Eds.) Language and Social Disadvantage (pp 9-27 ). Chichester: Wiley.
  • Ginsborg, J. (2004). Strategies for memorising music In A. Williamon.(Eds.) Musical Excellence: Strategies and techniques to enhance performance (pp 123-141 ). Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • Ginsborg, J. (2004). Singing by heart: memorisation strategies for the words and music of songs In J. Davidson.(Eds.) The music practitioner: exploring practices and research in the development of the expert music performer, teacher and listener (pp 149-160 ). Aldershot, UK: Ashgate.

Professional Activity

2016 – Board Member, Music in the Round

2012 – 2015  President, European Society for the Cognitive Sciences of Music

2012 – Associate Fellow, British Psychological Society (BPS)

2012 – Founding Member, Society for Interdisciplinary Musicology

2005 – Fellow, Higher Education Academy

2002 – British Voice Association

1999 – British Psychological Society (Division of Teachers and Researchers; Chartered Psychologist)

1999 – Society for Education, Music and Psychology Research (SEMPRE)

1995 – European Society for Cognition in Music (ESCOM)

1984 – Actors’ Equity (Division of Concert and Session Singers)

1979 – Incorporated Society of Musicians (Performers’ and Teachers’ Division)