RNCM Composers Chosen for LSO Panufnik Scheme

Congratulations to Grace Mason and Han Xu, two of six young composers selected to take part in the 2017 LSO Panufnik Composers Scheme.

Established in 2005 in memory of Sir Andrzej Panufnik, the scheme enables six young composers to experiment and develop their orchestral writing skills under the guidance of renowned composer Colin Matthews and LSO musicians. Each year, two composers are then chosen to write a 10 and five minute commission for performance during the Orchestra’s main Barbican season.

Grace, a third year undergraduate who recently received a commission by the BBC Proms and Radio 4 to celebrate the 300th anniversary of Handel’s Water Music, said: ‘I am absolutely thrilled to have been accepted onto the Panufnik Composers Scheme and to have the opportunity to write for the LSO.

‘I am looking forward to getting fully involved by taking part in the workshops, meeting the musicians and, most importantly, writing the piece to be performed by the orchestra and conductor François-Xavier Roth. It’s a really immersive scheme and it is wonderful to be able to watch the LSO rehearse and to gain mentorship from Colin Matthews and Christian Mason.’

Sharing similar excitement, postgraduate Han Xu said he was ‘very happy’ to be part of the scheme and was looking forward to gaining more experience of orchestral writing.

Since its inception 12 years ago, 13 RNCM composers have taken part in the scheme, including Larry Goves, Emily Howard, Matthew Sergeant, Duncan Ward, Jae-Moon Lee, Daniel Kidane, Jack Sheen and Bethan Morgan-Williams.

Professor Adam Gorb, Head of Composition, commented: ‘The LSO Panufnik Scheme is the UK’s leading provider of opportunities for emerging composers to work with a professional orchestra and we are really proud that Grace and Han Xu have been chosen to take part this year. The high success rate from the College directly reflects on the opportunities that our composition students get to write for the RNCM symphony Orchestra on the Brand New Days.’